VITAMIN CHECK

BLOOD TEST

£245

A blood test to measure levels of essential vitamins (Vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C, E) and Beta Carotene.

7 Tests Included

Seven Day Turnaround

Venous Blood Sample

Vitamin Check Blood Test

About this test

Vitamins are organic substances that are essential in small amounts for the normal functioning of the body. A varied diet usually includes all vitamin needs. Vegans, who eat no animal products, may be lacking in Vitamins D and B12. However, most Vitamin D is obtained from exposure to sunlight.

Who is this test for?

This test is for individuals who believe that their diet may be insufficient in certain vitamins and who wish to check their status.

 

How it Works:

Sample

Order your test. We will arrange for one of our trained phlebotomists to take your sample and send it to our accredited laboratory. 

We will email you with your results within the specified turnaround times.

Important Information:

Our tests are not a substitute for seeing your doctor, especially if you are suffering symptoms. We can arrange to have your results interpreted based on the information you have provided, but will not diagnose, consult or provide any treatment. (This incurs an additional cost and will need to be requested at time of ordering).

You will be advised to see your doctor.

The prices shown above do not include Phlebotomy fees.

Tests Included:

Vitamins

Vitamin A (retinol) is a fat-soluble vitamin found in animal products such as eggs, dairy, liver and kidneys. It is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and foetus.

Vitamin A deficiency can lead to dry eyes (xerophthalmia), night blindness, skin problems, infections, diarrhoea and lung disorders.

Vitamin A can be toxic in high doses so it is important to never take more than the recommended daily allowance unless you have consulted with a doctor.

MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the average concentration of haemoglobin in your red blood cells.

Beta-carotene is a fat-soluble carotenoid found in plants, and is what gives carrots their orange colour. Your body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (retinol) and is a safe source of vitamin A because your body only converts as much as it needs. Excess vitamin A can be toxic. Vitamin A is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and fetus. Beta-carotene is also an antioxidant so protects the body from damaging free radicals. Sources of beta-carotene include carrots, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, sweet potatoes, squash and broccoli.

Vitamin A deficiency can lead to dry eyes (xerophthalmia), night blindness, skin problems, infections, diarrhoea and lung disorders.

Elevated beta-carotene in the blood may be due over-supplementing with vitamin A. Excessive beta-carotene can be damaging if you are a smoker or heavy drinker. Never take more than the recommended daily allowance unless you have consulted with a doctor.

Vitamin B1 is a water-soluble vitamin found mainly in beef, pork, poultry and offal. Good amounts are also found in whole-grains, legumes and nuts.

All B vitamins are crucial for the conversion of food into fuel and metabolising fats and proteins. It is important for the nervous system and brain function as well as a healthy liver, hair, skin and eyes. It also strengthens the immune system. Thiamine in particular is crucial in certain metabolic reactions and forming adenosine triphosphate which all cells in the body need.

It is fairly rare to be deficient in thiamine, however more common in people with alcoholism, Crohn disease, anorexia or those undergoing dialysis. Symptoms include headaches, nausea, fatigue, depression and abdominal discomfort. It can also make digesting carbohydrates difficult leading to a host of other health problems.

As vitamin B is water-soluble, toxicity rarely occurs and high levels in the blood will often be due to over-supplementing. However high levels of certain B vitamins may affect the liver or nervous system.

Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin found in foods like almonds, whole-grains, mushrooms, certain dairy products, eggs, brewer’s yeast and some green vegetables.

All B vitamins are crucial for the conversion of food into fuel and metabolising fats and proteins. It is important for the nervous system and brain function as well as a healthy liver, hair, skin and eyes. It also strengthens the immune system. Riboflavin in particular is an antioxidant so fights off damaging free radicals and helps the body use vitamin B6 and folate, as well as assisting in growth and red cell production.

Although rare, vitamin B2 deficiency can occur. Symptoms include anaemia, fatigue, slowed metabolism, nerve damage, a swollen tongue, mouth sores and cracks, skin inflammation, sore throat, swelling of the mucus membranes and changes in mood.

Elevated riboflavin is likely to be due to over-supplementation. Although high levels are rarely dangerous, vitamin B2 supplements can interact with other medication and cause a reaction.

Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin found in foods including some meat, poultry, fish, seafood dairy, lentils, beans, carrots, spinach, bananas, brown rice and whole-grains.

All B vitamins are crucial for the conversion of food into fuel and metabolising fats and proteins. It is important for the nervous system and brain function as well as a healthy liver, hair, skin and eyes. It also strengthens the immune system. Vitamin B6 in particular helps the body make neurotransmitters to carry signals between cells. It is also important for controlling homocysteine levels, brain function, hormone and red cell production and the immune system.

Although rare, a vitamin B6 deficiency can cause muscle weakness, nervousness, mood changes, difficulty concentrating and short-term memory loss.

Elevated vitamin B6 is likely to be due to over-supplementation. Although high levels are rarely dangerous, over-supplementation can cause temporary neurological disorders. Vitamin B6 supplements can also interact with other medication and cause a reaction.

Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin found in many fruits and vegetables including oranges, peppers, strawberries, blackcurrants, tomatoes, potatoes, broccoli and brussels sprouts.

Vitamin C is crucial for growth and repair of tissues, healing wounds, healthy bones and teeth and assisting the body with collagen production and iron absorption. It is also an antioxidant so fights off damaging free radicals.

Vitamin C deficiency can lead to scurvy although this is rare. Signs of a deficiency are tiredness, weakness, muscles and joint pain, bruising, small bruise-like spots, dry skin, splitting hair, swelling and bleeding gums, nose bleeds, tooth and bone weakness and problems fighting infections.

Low levels of vitamin C are more common amongst smokers.

As vitamin C is water-soluble it is unlikely to accumulate in the body. Taking vitamin C supplements can cause some reactions such as an upset stomach and diarrhoea.

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, whole grains and green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin E is important for keeping the immune system strong, for red blood cell formation and keeping the blood from clotting. It is also an antioxidant so fights off damaging free radicals.

Signs of vitamin E deficiency include muscle weakness and loss of muscle mass, vision problems, anaemia and neurological problems.

Elevated vitamin E from over-supplementation may increase risk of bleeding.

If you would like to make an enquiry or arrange a blood test can you please fill in the contact form below or call us on 01633 718001

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